Airtel DTH | Dil Titli Sa Song and Lyrics

See we dont dissapoint anyone do we ?? 🙂 Please find link to the Dil Titli Sa Song
Dil titli, Dil titli sa…
kabhi yaadon kabhi sapno ka…
Khoye Rang dhoondhta…
Khoye Khusbu ka pata…
Dil yaadon ki gali…
Khoya Saathi doondhta…
Dekhi zameen, Dekha Aasmaan…
Khojata Raha, tere nishaan…..
Dil titli, Dil titli sa… kabhi yaadon kabhi sapno ka… Dil titli, Dil titli sa…  
Please note that there is no separate album song for this, it is exclusively for Airtel DTH. Please dont forget to add your comments about the song.. Enjoyyy
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Harley Davidson launching in India

 

Legendary American motorcycle maker Harley Davidson is all ready to setup shop in India coming week
Just a day stands between America’s most successful motorcycle-maker from gracing the Indian shores. Yes, we are talking about the iconic and cult brand Harley Davidson, which has enticed and charmed over a million bikers around the world and it continues to do so with the same enthusiasm and energy that it had 108 years back when William S. Harley made his first blueprint drawing of an engine designed to fit into a bicycle.
Harley Davidson has officially announced on its website that the company will make its foray in the fast-emerging and promising Indian market with its range of elite cruiser motorcycles. The model-range and its pricing are still under wraps as the product is yet to be launched. However this is a clear indication of the impact the recent economic showdown has had on the American economy. The US auto giants are now focusing on developing markets such as ours in order to reap the maximum possible benefits they can, to cover up on the lost ground and tap the potential of an emerging economy.
The import route for bikes above 800cc was opened in mid-2007 when the Indian government traded mangoes for Harley Davidson motorcycles. Yes, you read it right. For last 18 years, the Indian mangoes were banned in the US since the American government believed that the Indian farmers were using too many pesticides. In April 2007, the US government lifted the ban on Indian mangoes which meant that the Indian farmers could now be entitled to farm subsidies. In return, the Indian government revised the rule of importing high-capacity powered two-wheelers to India allowing bikes above 800cc to be imported legally in the Indian market.
However, the excise duties charged by the Indian government on 800cc and above capacity imported motorcycles are extremely difficult to overcome in order to gain a manageable profit margin. Hence Harley Davidson, which was the key factor in opening up the import route, held back its foray into India in 2007. The Japanese bike-maker Yamaha was the first one to make use of the import trade policy to launch its flagship model the YZF-R1 and its street-fighter model, the MT-01. Suzuki and Honda have followed suit by bringing in their international flagships to India and now Harley Davidson is all geared up and ready to roll into the country with its extensive range of life-style cruiser motorcycles.

Microsoft’s One App | New Mobile Platform for the developing world

It won’t work for the 40 million or so users of iPhones and iPod Touches, but Microsoft’s new mobile app platform could reach some 800 million people using lower powered devices in developing countries.
Called OneApp, the software is debuting in the next few weeks in South Africa, where mobile services vendor Blue Label Telecom will use it to manage a set of services including an electronic wallet.
Phone companies and others may use the software to deliver mobile apps, including Facebook, Twitter, Windows Live Messenger and additional apps they develop. It runs on a tiny 150 kilobyte program that’s installed on phones and accesses Web services through a cell network.
OneApp also handles the conversion of applications to run on the huge variety of phones less powerful than smartphones. A screenshot is below.
 
By the end of the year Microsoft will release a software toolkit for developers, but it doesn’t intend for the OneApp to be offered in the U.S. at all for the time being.
Instead it’s going after the wildfire growth of feature phones in countries such as India, where phone usage is growing 27 percent a year, according to Tim McDonough, a senior director on the team producing OneApp.
“We call it a reach play – how do you get to more users with apps and services,” he explained.
OneApp was created by the Unlimited Potential group overseen by Microsoft’s chief research and strategy officer, Craig Mundie, who has teams looking for huge, approaching market opportunities.
It’s also going to enhance the stack of software that Microsoft offers governments. A country’s health service could use OneApp to create an application that helps people diagnose an illness and decide whether to travel to a hospital, for instance.

Nokia to start Netbook Business

The world’s top cellphone maker Nokia will start to make laptops, entering a fiercely competitive but fast-growing market with a netbook running Microsoft’s Windows operating system

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in its first laptop. Analyst Neil Mawston from Strategy Analytics said the technology choices were a good win for the U.S. companies. “We believe ARM and Symbian are among the main losers from the Nokia Booklet announcement,” he said. Shares in ARM were 0.2 percent lower at 1400 GMT, underperforming slightly firmer DJ Stoxx European technology shares index. Shares in Nokia were 1.6 percent stronger at 8.91 euros, while Microsoft was 0.6 percent firmer. Nokia said it would unveil detailed specifications, market availability and pricing of its new device on Sept 2.

A source close to Nokia said the new netbook would use the upcoming Windows 7 operating system. Microsoft says a stripped-down version of Windows 7 will be introduced to netbooks the same time as its general release on Oct. 22. Local media reports in Taiwan have said that Compal, the world’s No. 2 contract laptop PC maker, has pitched netbook models to Nokia, but there has been no official confirmation from either side. Nokia declined to comment on the manufacturer it uses. Most of the world’s top electronics brands typically do their own design work, but outsource the manufacturing process to contract manufacturers such as Compal and its larger rival Quanta.